Courses

Courses

BIBLE COURSES

Advanced Bible BIB 350-370

An advanced study of the Bible with classical and modern commentaries focusing on understanding the major moral, religious, and theological issues. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the narrative of the text and the major moral, religious, and theological issues of the book; examine the text using a variety of classical and modern commentaries; and develop and apply biblical research skills and techniques.

·         Advanced Biblical Exegesis: Deuteronomy (BIB 370)

·         Advanced Biblical Exegesis: Exodus (BIB 355)

·         Advanced Biblical Exegesis: Leviticus (BIB 360)

·         Advanced Biblical Exegesis: Genesis (BIB 350)

·         Advanced Biblical Exegesis: Numbers (BIB 365)

 

Prophets and Writings BIB 200-230

A study of the text with classical commentaries focusing on understanding the major religious and theological issues. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the narrative of the text and the major religious and theological issues of the book; examine and analyze the text using a variety of classical commentaries; and develop and apply biblical research skills and techniques.

·         Biblical Exegesis: Joshua (BIB 205)

·         Biblical Exegesis: Judges (BIB 225)

·         Kings I (BIB 215)

·         Kings II (BIB 217)

·         Samuel I (BIB 220)

·         Samuel II (BIB 222)

 

Bible      BIB 250-270

A survey of the Bible with classic medieval commentary of Rashi, focusing on understanding the major moral, religious, and theological issues.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify major figures and events in the text; discuss the narrative of the text and the major religious, historical and philosophical elements of the book; articulate and discuss thematic elements of the text; examine and analyze the text using the classical commentary of Rashi; and apply biblical research skills and techniques.

·         Studies in Genesis and Classical Jewish Interpretation (BIB 250)

·         Studies in Exodus and Classical Jewish Interpretation (BIB 255)

·         Studies in Leviticus and Classical Jewish Interpretation (BIB 260)

·         Studies in Numbers and Classical Jewish Interpretation (BIB 265)

·         Studies in Deuteronomy and Classical Jewish Interpretation (BIB 270)

 

Prophets and Writings BIB 440 – 470

An advanced study of the narrative with classical and modern commentaries focusing on understanding the major moral, religious, and theological issues. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: examine and discuss in the original Hebrew the Biblical text and concepts found in the Book under study and outline the structure of the book; identify and discuss concepts in the narrative which have philosophical implications; explore and discuss the lives and messages of personalities and events in the text; differentiate between various approaches of the commentators; analyze portions of the texts in light of the selected commentaries; develop specific topics from biblical and Midrashic literature.

·         Joshua

·         Judges

·         Kings I

·         Kings II

·         Samuel I

·         Samuel II

·         Ruth

·         Esther

·         Daniel

·         Proverbs

·         Ecclesiastes

·         Song of Songs

 

EDUCATION COURSES

Adapting Curricula (EDU/ECE310)
This course provides an overview of the field of how to adapt early childhood curricula for children with special needs by focusing on educating young children with special needs,  partnership with families, developing individualized intervention plans and programs and monitoring progress, designing instructional programs, considerations for teaching children with specific disabilities, promoting emotional and social development,  helping young children develop motor and self-help skills, nurturing communication skills, encouraging the development of cognitive skills and literacy, and teaming: collaboration, problem solving, and consultation.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the challenge of educating young children with special needs; summarize partnership with families; develop individualized intervention plans and programs and monitor progress; design instructional programs; explain considerations for teaching children with specific disabilities; understand emotional and social development; illustrate helping young children develop motor and self-help skills; summarize how an educator can nurturing communication skills; describe the development of cognitive skills and literacy; and outline various teaming, collaboration, problem solving, and consultation.

 

Assessment in Early and Special Education (EDU/ECE309)
Major topics covered include: assessment as an ongoing and systematic process for collecting information in order to evaluate the development and make decisions to address the needs of the young child in a variety of childcare and learning environments; selecting appropriate assessment tools and processes; appropriate practices in selecting and evaluating a variety of formal and informal assessments; processes for organizing, analyzing, interpreting and sharing assessment information with appropriate individuals.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the legal and ethical basis for assessment practices and procedures; examine assessment as a comprehensive process for collecting information to inform the teaching, evaluation, and placement of children birth through age 8; describe the role and value of families as partners in a comprehensive assessment system; summarize the importance of a culturally responsive approach to assessment and evaluation; plan formal and informal assessment techniques and methods in order to collect information that determines children’s progress and levels of performance; evaluate assessment tools based on the purpose of the assessment being conducted; demonstrate how technology can be used in the assessment process, including how to use assistive technology for children with disabilities.

 

Assessment in Early Childhood Education (ECE302) 
Major topics covered include: assessment as an ongoing and systematic process for collecting information in order to evaluate the development and make decisions to address the needs of the young child in a variety of childcare and learning environments; selecting appropriate assessment tools and processes; appropriate practices in selecting and evaluating a variety of formal and informal assessments; processes for organizing, analyzing, interpreting and sharing assessment information with appropriate individuals.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the legal and ethical basis for assessment practices and procedures; use assessment as a comprehensive process for collecting information to inform the teaching, evaluation, and placement of children birth through age 8; identify the role and value of families as partners in a comprehensive assessment system; implement a culturally responsive approach to assessment and evaluation; select and use appropriate formal and informal assessment techniques and methods in order to collect information that determines children's progress and levels of performance; identify and select assessment tools based on the purpose of the assessment being conducted; understand how technology can be used in the assessment process, including how to use assistive technology for children with disabilities; practice formal and informal assessments of young children's cognitive, socio-emotional, linguistic and motor development; use basic test and measurement concepts as means for interpreting test results; summarize, share, and report assessment information to parents and a variety of early childhood education stakeholders.

 

Child Development (EDU/ECE301) 
Topics include: physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of children, birth through age eight; family and sociocultural influences on development; methods to observe and evaluate children's development; factors that influence young children's learning, health, and well-being.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the major theories of early childhood development; discuss the roles and influences of families on prenatal care and development; identify the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and language developmental characteristics of children from infancy through age eight; integrate the cognitive, social, emotional, physical, motor, and language developmental aspects of child development into a holistic view of the child; identify family and cultural influences on child development; dscuss how the environment in which a child learns and grows influences individual growth and development.

 

Creative Thinking and the Arts (EDU/ECE335) 
The goal of this course is for students to understand the vital importance of creative thinking and arts-based learning in early-childhood education. Students will learn how to interpret and promote children's creative thought and expression in original ways and will discover how the arts help children succeed in all academic areas. The course addresses which classroom supplies inspire true creativity and which should be avoided. The importance of play, music, movement, and dance are addressed for their importance in creative expression. Ways to assess creative processes and products, and methods for incorporating special-needs children into the creative environment will also be addressed.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:  define "creativity" and identify the stages of the creative process; discuss the reasons for the decline in creativity in schools and outline ways in which teachers can promote their students' creativity; distinguish between the different types of play and be able to explain how play supports a child's literary, social, and physical development; discuss autocratic, permissive, and democratic styles of teaching and explain how each of these hinders or enhances creativity; examine the Reggio-early-childhood art curriculum and explain why it is so successful; list the nine key opportunities that teachers should provide to students through art as identified by the National Art Education Association; provide examples of how teachers can use music and dance in their curriculum, paying attention to the various roles a teacher must take on to teach children these disciplines; examine several ways in which dramatic and sociodramatic play helps children grow and develop; describe features required to create classroom environments that nurture creative work; describe classroom environments that hinder children's creativity; examine how children's toys have changed over history; explain three consideration when performing an assessment of a creative product; examine the 12 qualities of genius in children and discuss ways teachers can apply this information to their approach to instruction; and discuss the interrelatedness of creativity and reason.

 

Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum (ECE305) 
Topics include: overview of curriculum planning and assessment; applying skills, knowledge, and principles used to plan curriculum in early childhood programs from infancy through early elementary grades; developmentally appropriate practices in curriculum design that takes into consideration curriculum standards; teachers' roles; family involvement; supportive resources and materials.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply the principles of curriculum development and implement various approaches to the development of curriculum; evaluate curriculum materials for their appropriateness to the young child and leaning setting; adapt leaning activities for children with disabilities; design appropriate learning activities and experiences for young children; identify a variety of teaching strategies that are effective for teaching young children; incorporate children's families and communities as resources for designing curriculum; select appropriate resources and materials, including technology, to support the curriculum design; use assessment strategies appropriate for young children; plan learning activities for a variety of groupings; structure cooperative learning experiences for young children; and plan learning activities based on learning standards for young children; develop learning activities that incorporate multiple learning domains.

 

Early Childhood Curriculum (ECE306) 
Topics include: review of recent research on play and development in the early childhood classroom; explore various instructional strategies and techniques designed to support a play-centered curriculum in the core curriculum areas; use of play as a form of assessment; research toys and technology that will support a play-based curriculum.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the development of play throughout the life span from a variety of theoretical perspectives; identify types of play based on a variety of forms such as ritual, story-making, games, and fairy tales, exploring the role of play in human experience; discuss the relationship of play to other aspects of development, such as language, logical-mathematical thinking, social and moral development, spiritual development, and creativity; critically reflect upon research and theory on play from the perspective of cultural bias; evaluate personal biases and evidence of collective bias and stereotyping in children's toys, games, and television programming and commercials, and demonstrate how these biases and stereotypes influence children's play; plan and facilitate play-based learning activities; and construct an understanding of the role of play in counseling and therapy.

 

Health, Safety and Nutrition in Early Childhood (EDU/ECE307) 
Topics include: in-depth exploration of the principles and practices that support the health, safety, and nutrition of young children birth through 8 years of age; positive health routines, hygiene, nutrition, feeding and clothing practices, childhood diseases, and safety; symptoms of and reporting procedures for child abuse will also be addressed.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply the principles and practices for good health and nutrition in the early childhood setting; plan appropriate meal practices for young children; identify common childhood diseases, and plan appropriate responses to their onset; plan child centered activities to promote young children's self care in the areas of health, safety and nutrition; design and apply the practices for providing a safe indoor and outdoor environment to prevent and reduce injuries; identify appropriate community resources related to health, safety, and nutrition; identify and discuss screenings and assessments that provide information on mental and health related issues for the young child; and identify the signs and symptoms of child abuse and neglect, and how to report them.

 

Introduction to Early Childhood Education (ECE300) 
An overview of the field of early childhood education; historical and theoretical bases for early childhood education; influence of standards-based instruction and assessment on current program practices; characteristics of the scope of early childhood programs (i.e., infant and toddler through early elementary age) and programs and practices appropriate for each level; the importance of working with children and families from diverse backgrounds.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the roles and responsibilities of professional early childhood educators and the importance of continued professional development; describe the variety of early childhood education program models and learning environments for children, birth through age eight; discuss the historical and theoretical bases for early childhood education; identify practices for early care and education that reflect sensitivity to differences in socioeconomic status, culture, ethnicity, and differing abilities; recognize the importance of working with the families and communities of the children they serve; apply and create developmentally appropriate practices and learning environments for children birth through eight years of age; use program and curriculum standards and assessment of children and programs to impact early childhood education programs; practice reflective thinking in becoming an effective early childhood educator; use observation to recognize the basic components of quality early childhood program setting; develop a beginning portfolio using knowledge of the teacher portfolio process.

 

Language Development (EDU/ECE 313) 
This course will develop knowledge the theoretical perspectives and the major concepts of language development: five aspects of language knowledge, levels of language knowledge, oral and written language modes, and the critical role of oral language competencies throughout the early childhood years and beyond.  Additionally, students will be exposed to language development and how teachers can enhance language development at each level.  Students will also learn how to assess language development with a wide variety of assessment tools.  This course also highlights how teachers can enhance language development among children with communicative disorders.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: develop knowledge and dispositions in the theoretical perspectives and contexts of language development; summarize language development among children of diversity; explain language development and ways to enhance language development of infants and toddlers; describe language development and ways to enhance language development of preschoolers; illustrate language development and ways to enhance language development of kindergartners; identify language development and ways to enhance language development of children in the primary years; examine various language assessments; and outline the importance of fostering language development through school-home connections.

 

Literacy Development (EDU/ECE325) 
This course provides a comprehensive understanding of literacy development from birth to age eight. Students will learn the content, skills, and dispositions appropriate for teaching literacy (reading, writing, listening and speaking) through exploration of current research and theory relevant to literacy, and practical approaches to facilitating literacy development.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the theoretical basis for literacy development and the developmental nature of literacy learning; make connections between oral language development and later success in learning to reading and write; explain the role of play in early literacy development; adapt and plan meaningful literacy experiences that integrate reading, writing, listening, and communicating competencies in the classroom; recognize and understand how to develop and improve children's reading fluency; design and implement activities and lessons to support literacy development among young children; plan for and provide a literate classroom environment to meet the diverse literacy needs of all students; use reading assessments for young children; and discuss the influence of families on literacy development.

 

Children’s Literature (ECE 326)

A comprehensive study of a wide-variety of children’s literature, with an emphasis on early childhood literature. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of ways literature can be used within the classroom to enhance a child’s development to promote literacy.

 

Management and Administration of Early Childhood Program (ECE 328)

This course is a study of the organization and administration of early childhood programs. The topics include the skills and characteristics of effective administrators; types of programs; planning, implementing and evaluating programs; policy development; staff supervision and development; finances and budget; record keeping; relevant state regulations and laws; developing, equipping and maintaining a facility; organizing a developmentally appropriate environment; collaboration with family and community; public relations; and contributing to the profession.

 

Mathematics in Early Childhood Education (EDU/ECE315) 
Topics include: mathematical content and methods essential for teaching early childhood learners in pre-kindergarten through early elementary grades; how children develop math skills; basic foundations of mathematics that children need; teaching methods and materials that facilitate their learning; mathematics content based on NCTM and common core standards.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss how the principles of early childhood education and mathematical concepts interact when teaching mathematics to young children; describe the mathematical concepts of number sense, number systems and their properties, computational estimation, as well as algebraic concepts (e.g., patterns, functions, using concrete objects to represent mathematical relationships), geometric figures and their properties, measurement, and data analysis (e.g., probability, graphing); develop effective units and lessons that align with state and national mathematics standards; develop lessons that incorporate various forms of communication as the young child develops mathematics knowledge and skills; apply effective and developmentally appropriate instructional strategies to help all students learn mathematics that includes the use of technology; use a variety of developmentally appropriate assessment tools that align with early childhood education curriculum and instruction; plan lessons that address student diversity and various approaches to learning; incorporate technology into mathematics lessons and; units; provide instruction that teaches early learners to use their mathematical skills in many different situations and applications to solve real life problems.

 

Music and Movement (EDU/ECE 312) 
This course will develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions in developing movement and motor activities for young children through the use of readings, Movement and Music (M2 Fun) activities, discussion topics, learning activities, and assessment quizzes. The knowledge, skills, and dispositions gained will provide greater understanding of individual needs of each child, the importance of the interaction between the environment and the curriculum in learning, the valuable connection between movement and music, the critical influence of family and community involvement in learning, and the significance of using standards and assessment to provide guidance in learning.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:develop knowledge and dispositions in meeting the cognitive, physical, and social-emotional needs of each child; explain how the environment and the learning curriculum enhance learning; describe the importance of movement and music in the curriculum for young children; express the importance of involving the child’s family and community in developing learning activities for young children; and summarize the importance of standards and assessment in improving learning.

 

School, Family, and Community Collaboration (EDU/ECE303) 
Topics include: exploring the value of school, family, and community partnerships for the education and development of the young child; family differences in terms of social, cultural, religious, and economic backgrounds; different approaches to parenting taken by families; ways to establish collaboration among schools, families, and communities across differences is examined, as a means for building and maintaining partnerships necessary to teach and care for the young child.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the impact of family, school, and community relationships on the education and development of children; be aware of the roles and responsibilities of families, schools, and communities in the education of the young child; apply the historical and philosophical foundations of the relationships among family, schools, and communities to practice; identify the various meanings attributed to "parental involvement; discuss how different parenting styles they influence children's participation in the school and community; use school, family, and community curricula that promote and support the development and well being of the young child; identify issues and practices to consider when working with families of children with disabilities; and discuss how socioeconomic, religious, and cultural factors impact family life.

 

Teaching Science to Young Children (EDU/ECE320) 
Topics include: exploration of science content and science content pedagogy appropriate for the young child; relevant theory and methodologies to provide age-appropriate science instruction within an early childhood development setting.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify appropriate instructional strategies to facilitate students' understanding of science; identify and explain young children's developing concepts of science; evaluate science lessons based on developmentally appropriate principles; implement effective research-based instruction to teach science to students in grades preK-3; recognize, develop, and improve children's knowledge and understanding of science; practice relevant pedagogical strategies and methods for science instruction to students in grades preK-8; accurately plan for and provide a classroom environment to meet the diverse needs of all students; adapt and plan meaningful learning experiences that integrate science, listening, and communicating competencies in the classroom; effectively evaluate materials to support science instruction and activities for appropriateness and safety of young children; and identify and correctly use common objects and experiences to support young children's science concept development.

 

The Exceptional Child (EDU/ECE304) 
Topics include: characteristics and educational needs of exceptional learners, birth through age eight; understanding students with specific exceptionalities and the appropriate instructional approaches and resources to serve their needs; the ways teachers and families collaborate to serve the needs of the exceptional children.

Students will be able to: discuss federal regulations related to children with exceptionalities; describe the characteristics of various types of exceptionalities, to include their signs, symptoms, and levels; practice various instructional approaches appropriate for the exceptional child; utilize educational programming and resources, including assistive technologies and adaptive equipment appropriate for various types of exceptionalities; discuss role of the IFSP and IEP in the educational planning process for the young child; use screening and assessment to support the learning and service needs of the exceptional child; discuss the function of Child Find and teachers' roles in that process; facilitate school, family, and community collaboration strategies to serve the needs of the exceptional child; create learning environments that support the learning and development of the exceptional child; facilitate the development of children in inclusive and segregated learning environments.

 

Masterful Classroom Management (EDU)

Teachers play various roles in a typical classroom, but their most essential role is that of classroom manager. Effective teaching and learning cannot take place in a poorly managed classroom. If students are disorderly and disrespectful, and no apparent routines and procedures guide behavior, chaos becomes the norm. In these situations, both teachers and students suffer. Teachers struggle to teach, and students most likely learn much less than they should. In contrast, well-managed classrooms provide an environment in which teaching and learning can flourish. 

But a well-managed classroom doesn’t just appear out of nowhere. It takes a good deal of effort to create, and the person who is most responsible for creating it is the teacher.

·         EXPLORE TEACHING IS THE MOST DIFFICULT OCCUPATION.

·         SUMMARIZE THE PROBLEMS OF CONTROL.

·         EXPLAIN HOW TO ESTABLISH PRESENCE.

·         DESCRIBE HOW DISCIPLINE CAN BE AS “EASY AS P.I.E.”

·         SYNTHESIZE HOW TO REWARD AND DISCIPLINE EFFECTIVELY.

·         DEVELOP HOW TO ESTABLISH ROUTINES IN YOUR CLASSROOM.

·         UNDERSTAND THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE IN THE CLASSROOM.

·         EVALUATE THE IMPORTANCE OF HYGIENE IN EDUCATION.

·         ILLUSTRATE HOW FIRST-YEAR TEACHERS CAN PREPARE FOR THEIR NEW CAREER.

·         JUSTIFY THE REWARD OF BEING A WORTHY EDUCATOR.

 

Managing the Environment for Students with Disabilities (EDU)

This course prepares the special educator to manage learning environments and student behaviors in the special education classroom as well as the inclusive classroom setting. This includes focusing on the theoretical foundations of classroom management and providing a physical, emotional, and social environment that is safe, supportive, and conducive to learning. This course emphasizes positive behavior interventions and supports, or PBIS, is an umbrella term that refers to a wide array of individual and systemic strategies to teach and strengthen appropriate behavior and to reduce challenging behavior. Abundant research supports the effectiveness of these techniques with all types and ages of students in all types of situations. For the most part, these techniques are relatively easy to use, mesh seamlessly with instruction, can be used with minimal training, and can be expected to produce desirable outcomes when used correctly.

·         Recognize models that explain challenging behavior. 

·         Evaluate positive behavior interventions and supports.

·         Describe rules and procedures to prevent challenging behavior.

·         Recommend effective use of scheduling, climate, and classroom planning and organization to prevent challenging behavior.

·         Explain high-quality instruction to prevent challenging behavior.

·         Describe behavioral monitoring to prevent challenging behavior.

·         Justify reasons to implement functional assessment.

·         Summarize how to effectively implement social skills instruction. 

·         Explain how to effectively prevent challenging behavior through reinforcement strategies.  

 

HISTORY COURSES

American Jewish History (HIS 457) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine the Jewish experience in America; discuss the central events and personalities in American Jewish history from colonial times to the present; and examine events in American history and its effects on Jewish life in America.

Instruction: 

Major topics include: a study of the American Jewish community from its colonial beginnings to the present, emphasizing such topics as, waves of Jewish immigration; patterns of Jewish settlement; economic activities; communal ties; philanthropic organizations; diversity within Jewish religious affiliation, with an emphasis on the various streams of the American Judaism; and challenges of traditional Judaism in America.

 

Early Modern Jewish History (HIS 355) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine and discuss the Early Modern Jewish History utilizing primary and secondary texts and documents. Discuss central events and personalities in Jewish history from the 1700's to the 1880's; examine the impact of emancipation, revolutions and reactions in Europe and changes arising from political, social, and economic developments and mass movements during the early modern period, on Jewish communities around the world; and analyze the impact of the forces and events of world history upon Jewish history.

Instruction: 

This course examines the early modern period of Jewish History. Topics include: Emancipation; Reform; French Revolution; Hassidic movement; Yeshiva; Enlightenment; Czar; Pale; and Mussar movement. The course also deals with the rise of nationalism, social movements, religious, cultural, social, political, and economic developments, and their impact.

 

History of the Oral Law (HIS 385) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the development of the Oral Law (Torah She'baal Peh), from Sinai to the redaction of the Talmud; Identify key personalities in the chain of tradition; identify the important works of Torah, their functions and impact; and discuss key concepts in the transmission of Torah.

Instruction: 

A study of the history and development of the Jewish tradition, emphasizing the evolution and transmission of the Oral Law from Sinai to the redaction of the Talmud. Topics include the primary components of the Oral Law; methods of codification; masters; legal authority; and impact of historical context and settings.

 

History: Medieval Spain (HIS 375) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine and discuss the historical period of medieval Spain utilizing primary and secondary texts and documents.

Instruction: 

A study of the major historical, cultural and political events, involving or affecting the Jewish people, in medieval Spain, emphasizing the lives of influential figures. Topics include the lives of R. Shmuel Hanagid; R. Yehudah Halevy; Jewish age of poetry; Maimonides, his life and works; controversies and bans on the works of Maimonides; Disputation; Columbus and the discovery of the New World.

 

History: Mishnaic Period (HIS 365) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine and discuss the major historical, cultural and political events and trends in Jewish history from the fall of Betar through the completion of the Mishna, emphasizing the lives of influential figures.

Instruction: 

This course is an in-depth study of the major historical, cultural and political events and trends in Jewish history from the fall of Betar through the completion of the Mishna. Topics include the Bar Kochba revolt; the impact of the Bar Kochba revolt; Hadrianic persecutions; Mishna; daily life in Mishnaic and Talmudic times; and the transition from the Mishnaic to Talmudic era.

 

Jewish Folklore (HIS 455) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: study Jewish folklore and examine its impact at that time and its impact on the future of the Jewish people; describe various events throughout Jewish history from the Jewish perspective; compare and contrast events from different eras of Jewish history; and utilize primary sources to research a chosen topic in Jewish History.

Instruction: 

This course examines a variety of episodes in Jewish history or folklore, much of which are stranger than fiction. Major topics include: Jewish Perspectives of Early Christianity; Rabbinic controversy; Forgers and Forgeries of Jewish texts; and the Golem.

 

Modern Jewish History (HIS 360) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine and discuss the Modern Period of Jewish History utilizing primary and secondary texts and documents. Discuss central events and personalities in Jewish history from the 1880's to the present; and examine the impact of revolutions and reactions in Europe and changes arising from political, social, and economic developments and mass movements during the modern period, on Jewish communities around the world.

Instruction: 

The course studies topics from the modern period of Jewish History, the 1880's to the present. Topics include emigration to America; World War I; Zionism; World War II; the State if Israel; and the impact of social movements, religious, cultural, social, political, and economic developments.

 

Modern Middle East (HIS 470) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the history of Jews in the Middle East; examine the historical relationship between Islam and Judaism and the Arabs and Jews; and examine primary and secondary texts.

Instruction: 

A study of Jews and the Modern Middle East. Focusing on the transition to modern times in the Middle East; Messianism; impact and European intervention on behalf of non-Muslims; social, economic, and cultural transformations; Zionism and Mideast Jewry; Arab and ; Jewish nationalism; World War II; and Mideast, Israel, and new diasporas.

 

Response to Modernity (HIS 455) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine the Rabbinic response to general culture in modern times; define modernity and its challenges to traditional Jewish life; analyze world events and its impact on general culture; examine general culture and its impact on the Jewish communities; examine the emergence of new forms of religious and political expression among Jews as a response to emancipation; and discuss and contrast the differences between Western and Eastern Europe in terms of emancipation, religious reform.

Instruction: 

Students will study the factors that influenced Rabbinic responses and the variety of responses these influences helped to generate. Topics include: world events and its impact on general culture; general culture and its impact on the Jewish communities; cultural differences between Eastern and Western Europe; the Torah only approach; Torah and Derech Erez approach; and Rabbinic personalities including Rabbis Bernays, Ettlinger, Hirsch, Hildesheimer, Dessler and Schwab, and their views and differing approaches relating to modernity.

 

Survey of Jewish History I (HIS 200)

Objectives: Demonstrate knowledge of Jewish history; describe the Jewish peoples relationships with the countries in which they resided; describe the major victories and conflicts that the Jewish people experienced; identify events that led to key turning points in Jewish history; identify key figures and place in Jewish history; and describe the influence of other cultures on different Jewish communities.

Instruction: Students will survey of the history of the Jewish people from ancient to modern times. Students will examine the intellectual, political and social history of the Jews and there interactions with peoples across time and place.

 

Survey of Jewish History II (HIS 201)

Objectives: Demonstrate knowledge of Jewish history; describe the Jewish peoples relationships with the countries in which they resided; describe the major victories and conflicts that the Jewish people experienced; identify events that led to key turning points in Jewish history; identify key figures and place in Jewish history; and describe the influence of other cultures on different Jewish communities.

Instruction: A continuation of Survey of Jewish History I. Students will survey of the history of the Jewish people from ancient to modern times. Students will examine the intellectual, political and social history of the Jews and there interactions with peoples across time and place.

 

Religious Observance in the Holocaust (HIS)

This course will analyze religiously-oriented responses of the victims of Nazi perpetrations.  Specifically, it will focus on understanding the mindset of Jews during the Holocaust as they relate to Torah and mitzvos. 

The course is split into five units: (1) Introduction; (2) Voluntary suicide in the face of violations of religious morals; (3) The decision to adhere to the mitzvos even under the most dire circumstances; (4) Rebuilding a shattered life and psyche via finding meaning in the Torah; (5) A culminating unit that integrates earlier units.

 

Survivors and Their Struggles (HIS)

This course will analyze the long-lasting effects that the Holocaust had on its survivors.  Specifically, it will focus on understanding the various emotions that survivors deal with on a daily basis. The course is split into five units, with an introduction and cumulating essay that integrates the units.

The units are: (1) Survivor guilt; (2) Understanding the inability of survivors to relate to their new environment; (3) The loneliness experienced by survivors; (4) Survivor anger and guilt; (5) The legacy of survivors.

 

Acts of Righteousness – Acts of Brutality (HIS)

This course will analyze specific acts of Nazi brutality and contrast them to acts of righteousness and self-sacrifice.  The course is split into three units, with an introduction and cumulating essay that integrates the units.  The units are: (1) Breakdown of the family unit; (2) Dichotomy between the acts of righteousness and acts of brutality; (3) Heroes and Villains.

 

 

JEWISH LAW COURSES

Blessings I (JLW 440) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of blessings and its legal ramifications; define the legal- Halachic terminology pertaining to the laws of blessings; identify and examine governing principles and theory; and apply legal reasoning to practical issues.

Instruction: 

This is an advanced study of the laws of blessings on food items using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Emphasis is placed on identifying and examining governing principles and theory and to develop the skills and ability to apply legal reasoning to practical applications and scenarios. Major topics covered in the course are: general principles of blessings; formal structures of blessings; Biblical and Talmudic sources of blessings; reciting a blessing; blessings prior to eating; interruptions and blessings; primary and secondary foods.

 

Blessings II (JLW 441) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of blessings and its legal ramifications; define the legal- Halachic terminology pertaining to the laws of blessings; identify and examine governing principles and theory; and apply legal reasoning to practical issues.

Instruction: 

An advanced study of the laws of blessings using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Emphasis is placed on identifying and examining governing principles and theory and to develop the skills and ability to apply legal reasoning to practical applications and scenarios. Major topics include: the order of blessings; making blessings on behalf of others; invalid blessings; un-required blessings; blessings made in vain; blessings made after foods; principles of blessings; structure of blessings; Biblical and Talmudic sources of blessings.

 

Dietary Laws I (JLW 430) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe Biblical and Rabbinic ordinances as applicable to food preparation and consumption; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic ordinances and effects on dietary laws; discuss and analyze the status of mixtures of permissible and non-permissible foods; analyze scenarios dealing with contemporary situations, that deal with issues related to heat, steam, and soaking, as well as foods touching one other and vessels, as applied to kosher and non-kosher products.

Instruction: 

A comprehensive survey of the Jewish Dietary Law to provide the student with the knowledge of the Jewish dietary law. Major topics include: prohibited foods; Biblical and rabbinic prohibitions; mixing meat and milk; categories of nullification; and categories of taste. Emphasis is placed on practical contemporary issues.

 

Dietary Laws II (JLW 431) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine the dietary laws governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law and their legal ramifications; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction: 

A comprehensive survey of the Jewish Dietary Law that provides students with the knowledge of the Jewish dietary law. Major topics include: immersing new vessels and utensils; prepared cooked foods; prepared baked goods; insect infestation in vegetables; and dairy products. Emphasis is placed on practical contemporary issues.

 

Jewish Law: Festivals I (JLW 475) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Festivals as found in the Code of Jewish Law; compare and contrast the laws of the Sabbath with those of the Festivals; define the legal- Halachic terminology pertaining to the laws discussed; trace the laws to their biblical roots; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary issues and scenarios.

Instruction: 

An in-depth study of the laws of the Festivals governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law. Emphasis is placed on differentiating the laws of the Festivals with those of the Sabbath, Emphasis is also placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics include: analyzing prohibited labors; positive commandments relating to the Festivals; and preparations done for and on the Festivals.

 

Jewish Law: Festivals II (JLW 480)
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Festivals as found in the Code of Jewish Law; compare and contrast the laws of the Sabbath with those of the Festivals; define the legal- Halachic terminology pertaining to the laws discussed; trace the laws to their biblical roots; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary issues and scenarios.  

Instruction: 

An in–depth study of the laws of the Festivals governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law. Emphasis is placed on differentiating the laws of the Festivals with those of the Sabbath, Emphasis is also placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics include analyzing prohibited labors; positive commandments relating to the Festivals; and preparations done for and on the Festivals.

 

Sabbath I (JLW 420) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law and their legal ramifications; define the legal-Halachic terminology pertaining to these laws; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction: 

An in-depth study of the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law sections covering selected topics. Emphasis is placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics covered are: Kiddush, Havdalah, and Hadlokas Neiros, Muktza, Amirah L'Akum, Tircha, Hachono, Uvdin D'chol, and Molid.

 

Sabbath II (JLW 421) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law regarding the study of selected labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath and their legal ramifications; define the legal-Halachic terminology pertaining to these laws; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction: 

An in-depth study of the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law, beginning with a study of labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath. The course focuses on the labors involved in the food production process. Emphasis is placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics covered are: labors relating to plowing through kneading, including plowing; sowing; reaping; separating; grinding and kneading.

 

Sabbath III (JLW 422) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law regarding the study of selected labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath and their legal ramifications; define the legal-Halachic terminology pertaining to these laws; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction: 

An in-depth study of the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law, beginning the study of labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath. The course focuses on the labors involved in the production of animal hides and garments. Emphasis is placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics covered are: labors relating to writing; erasing; sewing and tearing; tying and untying objects; dyeing; shearing; cleaning or laundering.

 

Sabbath IV (JLW 423) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law regarding the study of selected labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath and their legal ramifications; define the legal-Halachic terminology pertaining to these laws; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction: 

An in-depth study of the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law, beginning the study of labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath. The course focuses on the labors involved in the production of animal hides and issues dealing with construction. Emphasis is placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics covered are: trapping animals; slaughtering; building temporary and permanent structures; lighting and extinguishing flames.

 

Sabbath V (JLW 424) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of cooking on the Sabbath and their legal ramifications; define the legal-Halachic terminology pertaining to the laws of cooking on the Sabbath; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction: 

A comprehensive study and analysis of the laws of Sabbath as they relate to cooking using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Emphasis is placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios. Major topics covered are: defining cooking as it relates to the Sabbath; prohibitions for cooking on the Sabbath; cooking for the sick; reheating solid foods; reheating liquids; types of stoves and their legal ramifications; hatmanah or insulating foods before and during the Sabbath.

 

JEWISH MUSIC COURSES

Jewish Music (MUS400)

This course is a chronological overview of Jewish musical tradition from antiquity to the present, with a special focus on Hasidic music. Included is a brief survey of the major genres of Jewish music, together with listening to and discussion of representative works of selected composers from each genre.

Upon successful completion, students will be able to: Name sacred and secular musical traditions employed throughout the history of Judaism; Recall the identifying characteristics of all major genres of Jewish music, including Hasidic, Neo-Hasidic, Yiddish, Israeli folk song, and the music of the American Cantorate; Understand Jewish music in the context of political, religious and cultural influences; Recognize significant historical events and their impact on the evolution of Jewish music; Recognize and identify varied musical styles and techniques within the spectrum of Jewish music; Compare common musical characteristics, not only among various Jewish traditions, but also among but also among other cultural and religious traditions; Describe the evolution of Jewish music from antiquity to the present day; Predict the continuing evolution of Jewish music into the future.

 

Cantillation I (MUS 420) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the musical system of the bible; read the bible utilizing the cantillation system; identify the cantillation signs; discuss the legal/Halachic aspects involved in the public reading of the Bible; and use appropriate Hebrew grammar.

Instruction: 

This is a study of the music of the Bible, the cantillation system. This course focuses on the music of the Torah and Haftorah texts. While focus is placed on the musical system, emphasis is also on general rules and laws pertaining to the reading of the bible in the synagogue; errors made during readings; Hebrew grammar as it pertains to reading.

 

Cantillation II (MUS 422) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the musical system of the bible for special readings; read the bible utilizing the cantillation system; distinguish between the modes for various occasions; identify the cantillation signs; discuss the legal/Halachic aspects of the special public reading of the Bible; and use appropriate Hebrew grammar.

Instruction: 

The course surveys the special cantillation system of the High Holidays and Books of Esther, Lamentations, Ruth, Song of Songs and Kohelet. While focus is placed on the musical system, emphasis is also on general rules and laws pertaining to special readings in the synagogue; distinguishing between the various readings and corresponding holidays; Hebrew grammar.

 

JEWISH THOUGHT COURSES

Jewish Thought and Liturgy I (JTH 380) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: provide in depth analysis of the Jewish liturgy, highlighting the meaning and background of the text of the liturgy, including translations and clarifications of words and phrases.

Instruction: 

Students will undertake a close reading and in depth examination of selections from the Jewish liturgy which will enhance their understanding of the meaning of the prayers and the theology behind the structure and framework of the different sections of prayer.

 

Jewish Thought and Liturgy II (JTH 385) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze selections of the Jewish liturgy emphasizing the Amidah- the core of Jewish prayer. The meaning and backgrounds of the prayers will also be emphasized, including translations and clarifications of words and phrases.

Instruction: 

Students will undertake a close reading and in depth examination of selections from the Jewish liturgy which will enhance their understanding of the meaning of the prayers and the theology behind the structure and framework of the different sections of prayer.

 

The Jewish Calendar: Yearly Cycle I (JTH 200) 
Objectives: 

Recall events, days, and customs from the Jewish Calendar; understand the significance of events, days, and customs in the Jewish Calendar; apply Jewish laws and customs to the observance of Jewish Holidays; draw parallels and differentiate between Jewish Holidays or events on the Jewish Calendar; interpret the symbolism of significant days or events on the Jewish Calendar.

Instruction: 

This course examines days and events throughout the Jewish year; the essence behind the events; the correlation between holidays and their customs and rituals; the history and source for the holidays.

 

The Jewish Calendar: Yearly Cycle II (JTH 210) 
Objectives: 

Recall events, days, and customs from the Jewish Calendar; understand the significance of events, days, and customs in the Jewish Calendar; apply Jewish laws and customs to the observance of Jewish Holidays; draw parallels and differentiate between Jewish Holidays or events on the Jewish Calendar; interpret the symbolism of significant days or events on the Jewish Calendar.

Instruction: 

This course examines days and events throughout the Jewish year; the essence behind the events; the correlation between holidays and their customs and rituals; the history and source for the holidays.

 

Writings of Luzzato I (JTH 400) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the theological and ethical themes discussed in Luzzato's writings; discuss man's duty in the world; and examine human character traits and their effects.

Instruction: 

A close study of the theological and ethical themes in Luzzato's masterpiece, The Path of the Just. Topics include man's duty in the world; and the traits of vigilance, diligence, expurgation and self-denial.

 

Writings of Luzzato II (JTH 410) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the theological and ethical themes discussed in Luzzato's writings; and analyze the principles of religious belief in a systematic manner.

Instruction: 

This course examines the theological and ethical themes of Luzzato's The Way of G-d.  Students will study a systematic approach to Jewish thought. Major topics include the existence of G-d; creation; good and evil; freewill; the soul; resurrection; and providence.

 

Introduction to Judaism (JTH 100)

Objectives: Demonstrate knowledge of the basic theological concepts and practices of Judaism; describe the major Jewish festivals, the nature of their practice and their significance; identify the major classical literary works of the Jewish people; analyze Judaism’s beliefs and practices through the lens of Jewish values and through the lens of Western culture; and demonstrate critical thinking and articulate reasoned conclusions about Judaism’s theology and its relationship to modernity.

Instructions: This course introduces the student to the major religious and cultural dimensions of Judaism. Students will study the central tenants, beliefs, practices and literature of the Jewish faith.

 

LANGUAGE COURSES (HEBREW AND YIDDISH)

Advanced Modern Hebrew (MHEB 303) 
Objectives: 

This course combines the objectives Advanced Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 301) and Advanced Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 302). Students will be able to: derive meaning from context without understanding every word of conversation; follow a longer presentation in Hebrew on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places; decipher nuances of language; initiate conversations in Hebrew and sustain them for a longer period of time; converse in Hebrew in a variety of everyday, school, work or social situations; read consistently with full understanding of simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the student has personal interest or knowledge; get the gist of longer paragraphs when expectations cued by the text are fulfilled as well as to comprehend most details of simple informative texts; read and interpret poetry; read between the lines to interpret nuances and big ideas; write an essay that analyzes a topic in depth; and meet most practical writing needs and limited social demands such as taking notes on familiar topics, respond in writing to personal questions and write simple letters, brief synopses.

Instruction: 

Advanced Modern Hebrew (MHEB 303) is for students who completed Intermediate Modern Hebrew (MHEB 203) or students who have a relatively strong Hebrew proficiency. The primary objective of this course is to help learners improve their skills in Hebrew for the purpose of oral and written communication and reading comprehension.

Credit recommendation: 

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Advanced Modern Hebrew (MHEB 303) duplicates courses Advanced Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 301) and Advanced Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 302).

 

Advanced Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 301) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: derive meaning from context without understanding every word of conversation; follow a presentation in Hebrew on a number of topics; initiate conversations in Hebrew and sustain them for a longer period of time; converse in Hebrew in a variety of everyday, school, work or social situations; read consistently with full understanding of simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the student has personal interest or knowledge; get the gist of longer paragraphs when expectations cued by the text are fulfilled as well as comprehending most details of simple informative texts; and meet most practical writing needs and limited social demands such as taking notes on familiar topics, respond in writing to personal questions and write simple letters, brief synopses.

Instruction: 

Advanced Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 301) is designed for students who completed Intermediate Modern Hebrew or students who have a relatively strong Hebrew proficiency. The primary objective is to help learners improve their skills in Hebrew for the purpose of oral and written communication and reading comprehension.

Credit recommendation: 

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). 

 

Advanced Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 302) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: derive meaning from context without understanding every word of conversation; follow a longer presentation in Hebrew on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places; decipher nuances of language; initiate conversations in Hebrew and sustain them for a longer period of time; converse in Hebrew in a variety of everyday, school, work or social situations; read consistently with full understanding of simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the student has personal interest or knowledge; get the gist of longer paragraphs when expectations cued by the text are fulfilled as well as comprehending most details of simple informative texts; read and interpret poetry; read between the lines to interpret nuances and big ideas; write an essay that analyzes a topic in depth; and meet most practical writing needs and limited social demands such as taking notes on familiar topics, respond in writing to personal questions and write simple letters, brief synopses.

Instruction: 

Advanced Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 302) is designed for students who completed Advanced Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 301) or students who have a relatively strong Hebrew proficiency. The primary objective of this course is to help learners improve their skills in Hebrew for the purpose of oral and written communication and reading comprehension.

Credit recommendation: 

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Advanced Yiddish (YID 303) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: fulfill the objectives for Elementary Yiddish (YID 103) and Intermediate Yiddish (YID 203) as well as, responding to more complex scenarios; increased proficient reading skills that reflect comprehension, expanded vocabulary, and capacity to write responsively; increased knowledge and skill of correct verb usage, tenses, and integration into writing; and demonstrate the capacity to read and comprehend more complex Yiddish writings.

Instruction: 

The advanced course integrates the skills acquired by the student in elementary Yiddish and intermediate Yiddish, and extends the skills to advanced language proficiency. This includes reading comprehension, discourse, writing and reading. Students are expected to demonstrate an advanced level of facility and comprehension of complicated texts and situations, and be able to respond to them in a fluid discourse, reflecting skill and comfort.

Credit recommendation: 

In the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 8 semester hours in Advanced Yiddish, or Germanic Languages (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Elementary Biblical Hebrew (HEB 153) 
Objectives: 

Combines Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151) and Elementary Biblical Hebrew II (HEB 152). Students will be able to: read biblical Hebrew; transliterate Hebrew words; translate selected Biblical passages; parse and find the lexical form of verbs; explain the basics of verbal forms; understand basic syntax of Hebrew; and understand basic morphology of Hebrew and analyze word formation.

Instruction: 

Combines Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151) and Elementary Biblical Hebrew II (HEB 152). The primary goals of the elementary level are to introduce the elementary grammar forms, the regular verbal forms, the most frequent vocabulary, word formations and their inflection, and the characteristic syntax and other basic features of the language. Topics may include: the Hebrew alphabet; Writing - print and cursive; the vowel system (including vowel reduction); reading; the noun - gender and number, independent (personal) pronouns, demonstrative pronouns; interrogative pronouns, nominal sentence, the syntactic order "noun-adjective", the definite article (including before gutturals), the conjunction vav, some prepositions; construct case; pronominal suffixes; verb - overview; applying the verb pattern to selected Binyanim (stems); marker of the direct object; Yiqtol patterns of the strong verb active participle; forms of the imperative in the strong verb; and pronominal suffixes with verbs.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 8 semester hours in Biblical or Classical Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Elementary Biblical Hebrew (HEB 153) is a combination of Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151) and Elementary Biblical Hebrew II (HEB 152).

Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151) 
Objectives: 

The student will be able to: read biblical Hebrew (alphabet, vowels, pronunciation); transliterate Hebrew words; parse and find the lexical form of verbs; explain the basics of verbal forms (by roots, pronouns, gender, number, verbal stems, tenses, verbal forms, such as infinitive, participle); understand basic syntax of Hebrew; understand basic morphology of Hebrew and analyze word formation; read and translate selected biblical passages.

Instruction: 

The primary goals of Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151) are to introduce the elementary grammar forms, the regular verbal forms, the most frequent vocabulary, word formations and their inflection, and the characteristic syntax and other basic features of the language. Topics may include: The Hebrew alphabet; Writing - print and cursive; the vowel system (including vowel reduction); reading; the noun - gender and number; independent (personal) pronouns; demonstrative pronouns; interrogative pronouns; nominal sentence; the syntactic order "noun-adjective; the definite article; the conjunction vav; some prepositions; construct case; pronominal suffixes; verb - overview; qatal pattern (the strong verb) of Pa'al (Qal); and the direct object marker.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biblical or Classical Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Elementary Biblical Hebrew II (HEB 152) 
Objectives: 

In addition to the objectives for Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151), the student will be able to: parse and find the lexical form of more complex verbs; explain the verbal forms (by roots, pronouns, gender, number, verbal stems, tenses, verbal forms, such as infinitive, participle); extend the knowledge of syntax of biblical Hebrew; and analyze word formation.

Instruction: 

Students further their knowledge of biblical Hebrew. The primary goals of the elementary level II are to build on the materials introduced in elementary level I and add more complex aspects of biblical Hebrew. Topics may include: Mastering the (verb) Qatal pattern (the strong verb) in the Binyanim (stems); Yiqtol patterns of the strong verb active participle; forms of the imperative in the strong verb; and pronominal suffixes with verbs (accusative pronouns).

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biblical or Classical Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Elementary Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 101) 
Objectives: 

The student will be able to: understand short, memorized phrases and some sentence length utterances in face to face conversations with native speakers and each other; comprehend basic questions, statements and high frequency commands found in daily behavior involving family, school, leisure time activities; engage in basic communicative exchanges, mainly through recombination or expansion of learned material; describe daily actions, appearances from an established word bank; respond within conversations in full sentences that demonstrate proper syntactical usage with nouns and verbs- number and gender agreement; ask questions, cope with simple survival situations such as ordering a basic meal, asking for directions, or buying clothes; recognize Hebrew letters in both print and script; read familiar sight words effortlessly; decode unfamiliar words and phrases using root and contextual clues; begin to recognize basic grammatical structures when vocabulary is known or supplied and even extract meaning from a string of simple connected sentences; write simple, fixed expressions and limited memorized materials and some recombination thereof; write several sentences about themselves and their personal world; answer questions from oral and written prompts; write names, numbers, and other simple autobiographical information, as well as some short phrases and simple lists; recombine memorized materials into simple statements, short descriptive sentences or basic questions.

Instruction: 

Elementary Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 101) introduces English-speaking students to Modern Hebrew. The primary objective of this course is to help learners acquire some basic skills in Hebrew for the purposes of oral and written communication and reading comprehension. Communicative subjects: introducing people and oneself; greetings; finding information about people and places; professions; leisure time activities; description of people and places; counting and food. Linguistic subjects: the Hebrew Alphabet; nouns: number and gender features; pronouns: singular and plural; question words: "who?", "what?", "where?", "which?", "from where", "to where"; demonstrative pronouns: singular and plural; prepositions, particles and suffixes: from, of, for, and, the, at/in, to, with; present tense verb form: singular and plural; definite article; expression of possession; concept of root and root classification; noun-adjective agreement; numbers.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Elementary Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 102) 
Objectives: 

The student will be able to: understand simple sentences which consist of recombination of learned elements that involve school, restaurant, home, time, and simple directions in face to face conversations with their teacher, native speakers and each other; understand more complex questions; understand the essence of simple face to face conversations and instructions given by a sympathetic speaker; respond to questions in more complete sentences; engage in conversations involving greetings, likes and dislikes, obtain information regarding feelings, food and get directions; express themselves more confidently regarding themselves and family; leave a voice message in Hebrew; ask and answer questions, initiate and respond to simple statements, and maintain face to face conversations; understand main ideas and or some facts from the simplest connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs; read consistently with increased understanding simple, connected texts dealing with a variety of basic and social needs; identify basic structures and vocabulary in longer passages and to get the gist of the text by ignoring unfamiliar material; write connected sentences in small paragraphs; meet limited practical writing needs such as writing short notes, letters, and telephone messages.

Instruction: 

Elementary Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 102) is for students who completed Elementary Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 101) or those who are already familiar with the basic structures of the Hebrew language and have acquired the basic reading, listening, speaking and writing skills. The course objectives are to continue developing skills, with an emphasis on active use of the language in its cultural context. Communicative subjects: polite expressions; directions; food, cooking, and diet; messages; daily schedule; time; shopping; counting and numbers; the neighborhood; leisure activities; seasons and weather; health and body parts. Linguistic subjects: present and past tense of regular and irregular verbs; adverbs of quantity, degree, time and intensity; noun and noun phrases; derived adjectives; modal verbs; expressions of time and dates; and impersonal expressions.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Elementary Yiddish (YID 103) 
Objectives: 

The student will demonstrate fluency (unassisted) in pronunciation of vocalized and non-vocalized words; use basic grammar rules, sentence structure; analyze / identify /parse root words and sentences; use articles, verb tenses, prefixes and suffixes correctly; be able to read elementary passages of basic texts - conversational, instructional; comprehend simple passages taken from various sources, including elementary and popular texts, some reflecting history and culture of language; write basic autobiographical information in short sentences; respond to basic questions using complete sentences; and translate from Yiddish to English, and the reverse.

Instruction: 

Elementary Yiddish (YID 103) focuses on practical language skills and self-expression, and the ability to communicate and understand Yiddish. Content will include evaluating pronunciation, basic grammar skills, orthography, and simple writing skills, as well as written or oral response to aural selection.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 8 semester hours in Yiddish, or Germanic Languages (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew (HEB 253) 
Objectives: 

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew (HEB 253) is a combination of Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 251) and Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II (HEB 252). Students will be able to: understand more of the complexities in the language; demonstrate a larger biblical Hebrew vocabulary; understand more phonological features of Hebrew (such as diphthongs); master more advanced grammar, including the weak verbs and all verbal characteristics, such as moods, and the Infinitive (construct and absolute); understand more advanced biblical Hebrew morphology (such as special absolute forms and construct case, irregular endings); be familiar with more detailed syntactical features of biblical Hebrew, such as the different clauses; and read and interpret accurately most of the prose text, as well as a portion of the poetic biblical texts with comprehension and appreciation

Instruction: 

The primary goals of the intermediate level are to build upon the principles learned in the elementary level and allow students to advance in Hebrew vocabulary and grammar, verbal forms, and vocabulary, until they become proficient at translating the biblical text beyond the basic level. It will prepare the student to use the Hebrew text more competently for exegesis purposes. The course presents students with a larger picture of the language and provides those who do wish to continue to more advance study a very solid basis upon which they can build further, more scholarly study. Topics may include: passive participle; ayin-vav/ayin-yud conjugation; lamed-hey/lamed-yud conjugation; pey-nun/pey-yud-tzadi conjugation; and pey-vav-yud conjugation; ayin-ayin conjugation; pey-aleph conjugation; directive Hey; moods - jussive and cohortative; energic Nun (energicus Nun, modus energicus); and infinitive construct and infinitive absolute and their use.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 8 semester hours in Biblical or Classical Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Intermediate Biblical Hebrew (HEB 253) is a combination of Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 251) and Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II (HEB 252).

 

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 251) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand more of the complexities in the language; demonstrate a larger biblical Hebrew vocabulary; understand more phonological features of Hebrew (such as diphthongs); master more advanced grammar, including the weak verbs and verbal characteristics, such as moods, and the Infinitive; understand more advanced biblical Hebrew morphology (such as special absolute forms and construct case, irregular endings); be familiar with more detailed syntactical features of biblical Hebrew, such as the different clauses; and read and interpret most of the prose text, as well as a portion of the poetic biblical texts with comprehension and appreciation.

Instruction: 

The primary goals of Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 251) are to build upon the principles learned in the elementary level and allow students to advance in Hebrew vocabulary and grammar, verbal forms, and vocabulary, until they become proficient at translating the biblical text beyond the basic level. It will prepare the student to use the Hebrew text more competently for exegesis purposes. Students will be presented with a larger picture of the language and the course provides those who do wish to continue to more advanced study a very solid basis upon which they can build further, more scholarly study. Topics may include: passive participle; ayin-vav/ayin-yud conjugation; lamed-hey/lamed-yud conjugation; pey-nun/pey-yud-tzadi conjugation; and pey-vav-yud conjugation.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biblical or Classical Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II (HEB 252) 
Objectives: 

The student will be able to: understand more of the complexities in the language; demonstrate a larger biblical Hebrew vocabulary; master more advanced grammar, including more groups of the weak verbs and their characteristics, such as moods, and the Infinitive (construct and absolute); understand more advanced biblical Hebrew morphology (such as special absolute forms and construct case, irregular endings); be familiar with more detailed syntactical features of biblical Hebrew, such as the different clauses; and read and interpret accurately most of the prose text, as well as a portion of the poetic biblical texts with comprehension and appreciation.

Instruction: 

The primary goals of the intermediate level are to build upon the principles learned in the elementary level and in Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 251) and allow students to advance in Hebrew vocabulary and grammar, verbal forms, and vocabulary, until they become proficient at translating the biblical text beyond the basic level. It will prepare the student to use the Hebrew text more competently for exegesis purposes. The course presents the students with a larger picture of the language and provides those who do wish to continue to more advance study a very solid basis upon which they can build further, more scholarly study. Topics may include: ayin-ayin conjugation; pey-aleph conjugation, directive Hey, moods - jussive and cohortative, energic Nun (energicus Nun, modus energicus); infinitive construct and infinitive absolute and their use; and review of previous materials.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biblical or Classical Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Intermediate Modern Hebrew (MHEB 203) 
Objectives: 

This course combines the objectives of Intermediate Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 201) and Intermediate Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 202). Students will be able to: understand conversational Hebrew at normal speeds; understand more complex sentence structures; understand conversations with less verbal or visual cues; recognize basic constructions which allow for distinction between male and female, singular and plural, present and past tense; move from dialogues to paragraphs to complex sentence structures such as descriptions of people, places and situations; decipher text without understanding every word, inferring meaning from unknown vocabulary by relying on context; write a short composition with more complex syntactical structures including conditional clauses, declensions, conjugation and more sophisticated terms; and write short, simple letters. Content involves personal preferences, daily routine, everyday events, and other topics grounded in personal experiences.

Instruction: 

Intermediate Modern Hebrew is for students who have achieved basic proficiency in the grammar and structure of the Hebrew language. Students will study, strengthen and review syntax, vocabulary and linguistic structures in addition to further developing skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 8 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Intermediate Modern Hebrew (MHEB 203) duplicates courses Intermediate Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 201) and Intermediate Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 202).

 

Intermediate Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 201) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand conversational Hebrew at normal speeds; understand more complex sentence structures; understand conversations with less verbal or visual cues; recognize basic constructions which allow for distinction between male and female, singular and plural, present and past tense; move from dialogues to paragraphs to complex sentence structures such as descriptions of people, places and situations; and write a short composition with more complex syntactical structures including conditional clauses, declensions, conjugation and more sophisticated terms.

Instruction: 

Intermediate Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 201) is for students who have achieved basic proficiency in the grammar and structure of the Hebrew language. Students will study, strengthen and review syntax, vocabulary and linguistic structures in addition to further developing skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Communicative subjects: vacations and activities and relationships. Linguistic subjects: present, past, and future tenses of regular and irregular verbs; conditional sentences; time sentences; conjugated prepositions; and numbers and dates.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Intermediate Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 202) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand conversational Hebrew at normal speeds; understand more complex sentence structures; understand conversations with less verbal or visual cues; recognize basic constructions which allow for distinction between male and female, singular and plural, present and past tense; move from dialogues to paragraphs to complex sentence structures such as descriptions of people, places and situations; decipher text without understanding every word, inferring meaning from unknown vocabulary by relying on context; write a short composition with more complex syntactical structures including conditional clauses, declensions, conjugation and more sophisticated terms; and write short, simple letters. Content involves personal preferences, daily routine, everyday events, and other topics grounded in personal experiences.

Instruction: 

Intermediate Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 202) is for students who have achieved basic proficiency in the grammar and structure of the Hebrew language. Students will study, strengthen and review syntax, vocabulary and linguistic structures in addition to further developing skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

Intermediate Yiddish (YID 203) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: fulfill the objectives for Elementary Yiddish (YID 103) as well as, increased comprehension and vocalization of Yiddish words; proficiency in translation; further demonstrate skill with conjugation of verbs, prefixes and suffixes; a vocabulary of a minimum of 500 words; synthesize skills and write brief composition (personal, responsive, etc.); and compose responses to aural exercise using brief, but complete sentences.

Instruction: 

The intermediary course is built on the skills of the introductory Yiddish course, where a framework was provided for developing language skills in four areas: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This next level will move the student further along the language line, continuing with the development of the abilities to converse and read more fluidly using vocabulary and grammar skills learned in the elementary courses. There will be particular emphasis on verb usage and vocabulary building, and expanding the conversation base. On a cognitive level, intermediate skills will include a more detailed study of morphology, syntax and discourse, building upon the basic reading vocabulary and skills acquired in introductory Yiddish.

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 8 semester hours in Intermediate Yiddish, or Germanic Languages (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

 

PHILOSOPHY COURSES

Biomedical Ethics: A Jewish Perspective (PHI 425) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze ethical issues that arise in the field of medicine; identify the general ethical principles; examine Jewish ethical principles that govern biomedical decisions; and compare and contrast Anglo-Saxon law, Jewish and other religious perspectives.

Instruction: 

This course examines biomedical ethical dilemmas and compares the secular, religious and Jewish perspectives. Topics covered include abortion, genetics, cloning, stem cell research, artificial insemination and euthanasia.

 

SOCIOLOGY AND LITERATURE

Jewish Food and Culture (SOC 200) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine sources of the laws pertinent to Jewish food; demonstrate understanding of symbolism behind food eaten on Sabbath and holidays; discuss how the Jewish cuisine evolved, focusing on some of the most popular elements; describe the role of the Kashrut agencies in allowing for the varied menu; and analyze primary sources to discover key elements of modern Jewish food and the surrounding culture.

Instruction: 

This course serves as a study of the laws and symbolism of Jewish food by examining food from an historical perspective and studying the evolution of Jewish cuisine and its unique cultural significance. Through in-depth readings, students will gain insights into the evolution of Jewish food as an individual culture, researching Jewish food today via primary sources.

 

Literature: Historical Fiction (LIT 200) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify some of the key time periods for the Jews; demonstrate knowledge and understanding of several historical novels consistent with these eras; discuss how the experiences of specific characters in the fictitious story are representative of true experiences of the time; describe the human aspect of the era, highlighting emotions, struggles, and triumphs of the Jewish spirit; define historical fiction, using specific stories as literary evidence; and synthesize different stories and different time periods into a deep understanding of the Jewish plight over the years.

Instruction: 

This course is a study of Jewish Historical fiction works designed to help students understand the meaning and purpose of the historical fiction genre. Students will form a general opinion of the value of historical fiction by reading books which provide an understanding of the human element with respect to various time periods.

 

TALMUD COURSES

Advanced Talmud (TAL 400-499) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the legal, homiletic, and philosophical material addressed in the selected texts; decipher the Talmudic text and show an advanced understanding of the Talmudic dialogue; discuss the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation and the precise literary elements of the Talmud and commentaries; read and analyze selected classical commentaries; and discuss, compare and contrast the variety of opinions and approaches of the commentaries.

Instruction: 

An advanced study of the selected texts with the commentary of Rashi, Tosafot and selections from other commentaries. Emphasis is placed on: developing the ability to approach the texts independently; conceptualizing abstract Talmudic concepts; advanced comprehension of the Talmudic text in light of selected commentaries; developing techniques to approach and decipher the commentaries; comparing, contrasting and restating Talmudic discussion based on the various commentaries; and applying analytical skills to the principles of Talmudic law, thought and philosophy found in the texts. Topics vary based on the texts selected.

 

Intermediate Talmud (TAL 300-399) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the general legal, homiletic, and philosophical material of selected texts; discuss the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation and the precise literary elements of the Talmud; and discuss the approach and opinions of the commentary of Rashi and other selected commentaries.

Instruction: 

A study of selected texts, with the accompanying commentaries, in the original Aramaic and Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on a correct reading and comprehension of the Talmudic text with selected commentaries; decoding the text; building a vocabulary of Talmudic terms and idioms; developing techniques to approach and decipher the text; restating and summarizing Talmudic discussion in one's own words; reading and examining the Talmudic dialogue; and analyzing the principles of Talmudic law found in the texts. Topics vary based on the texts selected.

 

Talmud (TAL 200-299) 
 Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the general legal material of selected texts; discuss the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation and the precise literary elements of the Talmud; and discuss the approach and opinions of the commentary of Rashi.

Instruction: 

This course covers a study of selected texts, with the accompanying commentaries, in the original Aramaic and Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on a correct reading and comprehension of the Talmudic text with selected commentaries; decoding the text; building a vocabulary of Talmudic terms and idioms; developing techniques to approach and decipher the text; restating and summarizing Talmudic discussion in one's own words; reading and examining the Talmudic dialogue; and analyzing the principles of Talmudic law found in the texts. Topics vary based on the texts selected.

 

BUSINESS COURSES

Economics, Ethics and Jewish Law I (BUS 450) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the importance of an ethical workplace and business practices; identify and recognize potential ethical dilemmas in the workplace; and apply the ethical principles found in the bible and Talmud to contemporary situations.

Instruction: 

This course introduces the student to ethics in the workplace. Students will examine ethical and moral issues in the contemporary workplace using a somewhat historical approach, by tracing ethical and moral foundations as far back as the bible. Topics include: the ideal occupation; biblical foundations of business ethics; moral leadership; and caring for the environment.

 

Economics, Ethics and Jewish Law II (BUS 460) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze moral dilemmas in a variety of settings; identify the general principles in Jewish law that govern commercial relations; and examine the interface between economics and United States and Jewish law.

Instruction: 

The course will use the case study method to present and analyze moral dilemmas in a variety of settings. Topics include: false goodwill, advertising and marketing; salesmanship; pricing policies; labor relations; and competition.

 

Advanced Taxation (ACC 353) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate use of the fundamental concepts of the federal income tax system as applied to individuals, corporations, and fiduciaries; prepare tax forms for individuals, partnerships, corporations and trusts; recognize tax planning opportunities and recommend appropriate tax-saving strategies for decision making; and apply the fundamentals of tax law and research to problem situations likely to be encountered in tax practice.

Instruction: 

The course is offered in a distance learning format with instructor support, graded assignments, and a cumulative assessment. Topics covered include: Individual determination of tax; gross income inclusions; gross income exclusions; property transactions; capital gains and losses; deductions and losses; itemized deductions; losses and bad debts; employee expenses and deferred compensation; depreciation; cost recovery; amortization and; depletion; accounting periods and methods; property transactions; non-taxable exchanges; property transactions; Section1231 and recapture; special tax computation methods; tax credits. Corporations- tax research; corporate formations and capital structure; corporate income tax; corporate nonliquidating distributions; other corporate tax levies; corporate liquidating distributions; corporate acquisitions and reorganizations; partnership formation and operation; special partnership issues; administrative procedures; gift tax; estate tax, income taxation of trusts and estates.

 

Advanced Taxation I (ACC 351) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the concepts, principles, and rules of taxation of individuals and small businesses; apply the fundamentals of tax law and research to problem situations likely to be encountered in tax practice in dealing with individuals; prepare moderately complex tax forms for individuals and sole proprietorships; recognize tax planning opportunities and recommend appropriate tax-saving strategies for decision making; and address tax situations for all types of taxpayers.

Instruction: 

The course is offered in a distance learning format with instructor support, graded assignments, and a cumulative assessment. Topics include: determination of tax, gross income inclusions, gross income exclusions, property transactions, capital gains and losses, deductions and losses, itemized deductions, losses and bad debts, employee expenses and deferred compensation, depreciation, cost recovery, amortization and depletion, accounting periods and methods, property transactions, non-taxable exchanges, property transactions, Section1231 and recapture, special tax computation methods, and tax credits.

 

Advanced Taxation II (ACC 352) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental concepts of the federal income tax system as applied to corporations, and fiduciaries, prepare tax forms for partnerships, corporations and trusts, recognize tax planning opportunities and recommend appropriate tax-saving strategies for decision making, and apply the fundamentals of tax law and research to problem situations likely to be encountered in tax practice.

Instruction: 

The course is offered in a distance learning format with instructor support, graded assignments, and a cumulative assessment. Topics  include: corporations- tax research; corporate formations and capital structure, corporate income tax, corporate non liquidating distributions, other corporate tax levies, corporate liquidating distributions, corporate acquisitions and reorganizations, partnership formation and operation, special partnership issues, administrative procedures, gift tax, estate tax, and income taxation of trusts and estates.

 

Basic Taxation (ACC 200) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the concepts, principles, and rules of taxation of individuals and small businesses; prepare tax forms for individuals and sole proprietorships; recognize tax planning opportunities and recommend appropriate tax-saving strategies for decision making; address tax situations for all types of taxpayers, such as wage earners, salespersons, small business owners, professionals, investors, home and rental property owners, farmers, etc.

Instruction: 

The course is offered in a distance learning format with instructor support, graded assignments, and a cumulative assessment. Topics covered include: general tax principles, exemptions, the tax computation, gross income exclusions and inclusions, gain or loss on the sale or exchange of property, capital gains and losses, business deductions, other allowable deductions; accelerated cost-recovery, depletion and amortization, business and casualty losses, bad debts, self-employment tax, estimated tax, and payroll taxes, income tax withholding, tax credits, special provisions, ethics and regulations governing the practice of tax practitioners.

 

Personal Finance (FIN 200) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the relationship between lifestyle and personal financial management the process for setting personal financial goals; develop personal financial goals; describe how to maintain records and the mechanics of preparing financial statements; develop a system of record keeping that monitors cash flows; determine financial services applicable to personal financial needs; identify the options involved in making major purchases; discuss the advantages and disadvantages of renting versus buying a home or automobile; differentiate among types of insurance; describe the principles of investment; distinguish features of stocks, bonds, and mutual funds; evaluate sources of professional investment management and services; and develop a plan for building an estate and retirement.

Instruction: 

The course is offered in a distance learning format with instructor support, graded assignments, and a cumulative assessment. Topics include an overview of a financial plan, planning with personal financial statements, applying time value concepts, using tax concepts for planning, managing money, assessing and securing credit, managing credit, personal loans, purchasing and financing a home, auto and homeowner's insurance, health and disability insurance, life insurance, investing fundamentals, investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds, asset allocation, retirement planning, and estate planning.

 

Principles of Accounting I, Financial Accounting (ACC 101) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand the role of accounting in the business environment; understand and apply the basic accounting equation; determine the proper debit or credit classification for an account or transaction; understand the accounting cycle; prepare journal entries, adjusting journal entries, and closing journal entries; understand and apply various inventory costing methods; define internal controls, and explain why they are important; prepare a bank reconciliation; account for accounts receivable, including uncollectible accounts; account for liabilities, including salaries, bonds payable, and long term/short term notes payable; account for equity transactions for a corporation; read, understand, and prepare a statement of cash flows; and use financial statement information to analyze company performance.

Instruction: 

The course is offered in a distance learning format with instructor support, graded assignments, and a cumulative assessment. Topics include: accounting and business environment, recording transactions, adjusting process, the accounting cycle, merchandising operations, inventory, internal controls, receivables, plant assets and intangibles, current liabilities and payroll, long-term liabilities, classification of liabilities, corporations: paid-in capital; corporations: retained earnings, and statement of cash flows.

 

Principles of Accounting II, Managerial Accounting (ACC 102) 
Objectives: 

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand the difference between financial and managerial accounting; utilize cost management tools such as activity based costing, job order costing, and process costing to make managerial decisions; understand cost behavior and prepare Cost-Volume-Profit analysis to make business decisions; understand how managers make decisions such as special orders, pricing, or outsourcing using financial information; explain time-value of money concepts and how they affect capital decisions; prepare and understand master budgets; prepare and understand flexible budgets and standard costing; and evaluate business performance both internally and against industrial benchmarks.

Instruction: 

The course is offered in a distance learning format with instructor support, graded assignments, and a cumulative assessment. Topics include: introduction to managerial accounting, job order and process costing, activity-based costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, short-term business decisions, capital investment decisions, time value of money, master budgets, flexible budgets, and performance evaluations.

 

OTHER COURSES

Ethical Communication (COM 400)

Ethics of communication explores the pervasive power of speech and its effects on interpersonal relationships. The Biblical sources delineating forbidden communication; the prohibitions of speaking and accepting forbidden speech and the consequences of listening to and accepting such speech; Topics include: gossip, libel; slander; rebuke; tacit speech; degrading comments about friends neighbors and colleagues; speaking both good and evil about others in the workplace; speaking about groups of people, speaking in front of the subject himself; speaking secretly about a person; and other topics.

 

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: discuss the ethical and moral issues of communication; identify and discuss the sources, and issues that dictate ethical communication in interpersonal relationships; use their theoretical knowledge to assess whether specific forms of contextual communication is permitted or forbidden; and present alternative permissible and appropriate ethical responses for the various situations and involved parties. 

 

Science of Nutrition (BIO 200)

Objectives: Identify and predict social and cultural forces that shape food habits, attitudes toward food, and beliefs about the relationship of food to nutrition and health; evaluate various forms of nutritional (mis)information; list and describe the metabolic roles of the major nutrients and identify nutrient dense food sources for each nutrients; contrast the process of digestion and absorption involved for each of the nutrients; define, classify and discuss the functions of dietary fiber; define, classify and discuss the metabolic roles of vitamins and minerals; identify the disease associated with the nutrient deficiency and toxicity; read and evaluate nutrition food labels; describe and discuss examples of diseases that have dietary implications; list and discuss the major eating disorders and their nutritional implications; discuss the relationship of dietary intake to weight management, sports performance, chronic diseases, and global nutrition (hunger); compare and contrast nutrient, caloric, and food requirements at the various stages of the life cycle; describe and discuss examples of how the Scientific Method can be used to evaluate nutritional claims; apply the principles of the Scientific Method to evaluate journal articles; and analyze and evaluate personal dietary intake, making specific suggestions to improve the diet based on the scientific principles of a balanced diet.

Instructions: Students will study the basic principles of nutrition, sources, and functions of the nutrients in all stages of the life cycle, nutrition as a world problem, and consumer problems related to food. Course topics such as weight loss, sports nutrition, food safety, the diet-disease relationship, global nutrition, and analysis of special nutritional requirements and needs during the life cycle, are emphasized.


Last modified: Monday, 21 March 2016, 9:59 PM